nettle tea

Nettle tea can be made with a little effort from this wild plant’s leaves. Read here about what positive effects tea has on health and how to use it properly.

Nettle (Urtica dioica), which can often be an uninvited guest in your garden, has exceptional healing properties. The plant has been used for centuries as food, tea, juice, or extract for all kinds of treatments and against various diseases. Trendy is nettle tea, which you can easily make yourself. It is used, among other things, in the treatment of urinary tract and prostate problems, gout, respiratory diseases, and pollen fever.

This wild herb is not only used in the kitchen – there are numerous nettle preparations in naturopathy and cosmetics. Different types of nettles are used for production. If nettle leaves are dried, ground, boiled, or soaked, they lose their burning properties and safely be eaten. The healing effects of nettle have already been studied in several clinical studies.

Nettle tea: basically basic
To make medicinal nettle tea, young nettle leaves (Urtica dioica) are picked before it blooms. Pour a handful of fresh or 2 to 3 tablespoons of dried herbs with half a liter of boiling water. Due to its diuretic and anti-inflammatory properties, tea is mainly used for cystitis and urinary tract infections.

What is the effect of nettle tea?

Nettle ingredients, especially flavonoids, have a dehydrating (astringent) effect and inhibit bacteria. Therefore, nettle tea is primarily used to remove stored water from body cells (for example, after long treatments with cortisone or cellulite). The effect of dehydration is often advertised in the beauty industry for “cleansing” and “detoxification.” Increased urine production by stimulating the kidneys helps eliminate toxins faster (for example, after taking medication for a long time). Nettle tea rinsing therapy cleanses and strengthens the urinary tract with potassium. The study has already proven that nettle extracts have a calming effect on an enlarged prostate’s symptoms (benign prostatic hyperplasia).

nettle

Nettle tea can also have a desensitizing effect on histamine-containing pollen fever and reduce itching and sneezing. Vitamins (especially A and C) and trace elements in nettle strengthen health and the immune system. The effect of nettle on boosting immunity is even significantly greater than the well-known echinacea effect. And last but not least, herbal tea is not only healthy but also delicious, healthy food. The plant can be easily harvested in your own garden and processed in a few simple steps.

Nettle tea: tips for use

While nettle root tea is primarily used for prostate problems, a tincture made from the leaves has been proven to treat diseases of the urinary tract. In short, the most important areas of application:

  • Purification: Nettle tea is used internally to stimulate metabolism and expel toxins from the body. Therefore, it is often part of fasting and spring treatments.
  • Urinary tract flushing: Home remedies can help against cystitis and other urinary tract infections.
  • Inflammation of the skin: Nettle has also been shown to be a medicinal plant for skin problems. Wraps with towels dipped in chilled nettle tea soothe acne and skin irritation.
  • Rheumatic problems: The nettle ingredients have an anti-inflammatory effect and should alleviate rheumatic pain.
  • Hay fever: Treatment by drinking nettle juice can have a desensitizing effect and reduce allergy symptoms such as itching and sneezing.

Make your own nettle tea: harvesting tips

To prepare fresh nettle tea yourself, you can also use fresh, young nettle plants, as well as dried plants. For medicinal purposes, nettle leaves should be picked shortly before flowering – the ideal time for collection is between March and May. Be sure to wear gloves during the harvest to protect yourself from stinging! It is best for spring medicine with nettle tea to cut fresh nettle leaves every day. You can repeat the treatment in the fall when the nettle goes through the summer harvest again.

Tip: Plants can be dried, especially if the shoots are hung upside down in bundles in a dark, airy place. You can also dry the nettle leaves on a gauze cloth. Store the dried plant in well-closed containers, protected from light, until you start using it.

Make strong nettle tea

For fresh nettle tea, pour a handful of fresh, young nettles or two to three tablespoons of dried herbs with 500 milliliters of boiling water. Let the tea simmer for about three to five minutes, covered, and then strain the leaves. Sweetened with sugar or honey, tea can be drunk hot or cold. If you do not want to pick nettle leaves yourself, you can also buy dried nettle at the pharmacy.

How much nettle tea can you drink per day?

With the use of nettle tea, start with one cup a day and gradually increase the amount. The maximum daily dose is 12 grams of nettle leaves – and the treatment should not last longer than six weeks. If nettle tea is not used as a stimulant, but to promote health during detoxification or treatment of the urinary tract with up to three cups a day, you should also ensure sufficient water intake in the form of mineral water!

Side effects of nettle tea

Insensitive people, drinking nettle tea can cause stomach upset. Allergy sufferers react with rashes and itching and should avoid tea. You should also avoid tea if you have reduced heart or kidney function. Excessive consumption threatens dehydration.

Many women look for natural products during pregnancy to get rid of water retention in their tissues. However, the consumption of nettle tea during pregnancy is controversial. Possible side effects, such as muscle discomfort and pain, and strong drainage, can negatively affect the development of pregnancy. Most doctors, therefore, advise not to take nettle tea during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

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