Hidden cases of Ebola in Europe

Rome, Italy – If you were surprised to hear that a United Nations worker died in Berlin on Tuesday from the deadly Ebola virus, you might be even more surprised to know how many other Ebola patients there are across Europe.

The World Health Organization confirms that there are eight deaths caused by Ebola in Europe caused by the current epidemic: two dead missionaries in Spain, one dead doctor in Germany, one cured man and one doctor in Germany, two doctors for tropical diseases the Netherlands. And Spanish nurse Teresa Romero Ramos on treatment in Spain. Remero Ramos got the virus from a dead Spanish missionary. There are also a dozen or more suspicious cases scattered in European hospitals that can prove that the Ebola epidemic really started in Europe.

Spain is the first country to accept important patients in Europe. It is also the first country to receive the first case of Ebola outside West Africa. At least one quarantined nurse in Germany treated one of the deceased doctors. If he were infected, she would now be the fourth non-West African health worker infected with the deadly disease alongside Teresa Romero and Nina Pharm, who contracted the disease from Thomas Eric Duncan, who died in Dallas last week. On Wednesday, another health worker who treated Duncan tested positive for a deadly virus.

Perhaps less surprising than the actual number of Ebola patients carved across Europe is the number of false alarms and suspicious cases in Europe and the capitals. Since Wednesday, there have been many suspicious cases reported in hospitals in Cyprus, Rome, Brussels, Peris, and London. Died in Macedonia by plane transported to Frankfurt for Ebola testing. More than 100 people who have been in contact with the Spanish sister are being monitored. They are also being tested for temperature twice a day.16 people are in quarantine, including her beautician and caretaker.

Cases of racism related to the virus have also become more frequent. Ghanaian football player Michael Essien, who plays for Milan, has been the subject of incitement directly related to the fear of this virus. The Italian sports paper published rumors from his teammates that he was Ebola positive and said they were nervous about it when they played on the field with him. He wrote on his Twitter account: “The Ebola virus is a severe problem. People would not know they should have joked with him. “
In Rome’s Portuense, home to the main infectious disease hospital called Spallazani, residents are extremely cautious and cautious. “I’m sure they have everything they need,” Maria Cristina Galo told Deily Best as she pushed. She also mentioned her two-year-old granddaughter in a wheelchair through this street: “What if a person infected with Ebola asks a resident or me how to find a hospital? What happens to that person before he enters an” isolated “environment? We are all in danger. “

Galina’s concern has increased with daily newspaper reports. In the last 48 hours, 5 suspected Ebola cases have appeared in Italy. These people have been in West Africa in the last two weeks. These cases are being checked in many emergency centers across Italy. One man had epilepsy. One had nosebleeds while one had symptoms such as African malaria, one man was diagnosed with flu symptoms.

It is only in Europe. Similar scenes have been observed throughout Europe. In each of these cases, the suspected patients were isolated in quarantine, where they are currently tested for the virus, even when they have no Ebola symptoms. “It is difficult to curb the panic.” Flavio Tuzi is the general secretary of the police union. “We are not ready. Our staff has numerous calls for infectious disease control, but we do not have biological suits to protect themselves.”

A plane flying from Istanbul to Pisa was forcibly landed on Tuesday afternoon, and Italy was sent for a test regarding the control of the Ebola epidemic. According to information directly from the airport, passengers from Bangladesh, mother and daughter started showing Ebola symptoms. They were in West Africa, an alarm was set off, and the flight was diverted. They were removed from the plane accompanied by staff trained in protective suits against biological danger. The plane was landed in Rome, and they were transported to the Spallanzani specialist hospital for control. Other passengers were checked for the deadly virus. They are also tested for fever and other symptoms of Ebola.
Ebola panic also gripped the airport in Glasgow, where a Dutch passenger on a KLM flight fell ill. After the emergency intervention of security workers who hurried to provide space and examine the passengers, it was determined that he had only the common flu.

Passengers traveling from the most endangered areas are all examined before entering and at many European airports and leaving the plane. Airports in larger cities have all the necessary measures and methods ready to stop the spread of this disease and even special clinics inside the airport. Temperature is useless if the carrier shows no symptoms.
Part of the panic stems from various information coming from many media. In Italy and Spain, for example, transparency is not a part of the national psyche, so information tends to spread from sources that are not relevant.

New fears arise from every false alarm. In this very subtle way, panic enters the population while the whole of Europe waits and wonders what will happen next.